Turkish eggs, with sourdough

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Ingredients

200 g Greek yoghurt (such as The Collective Straight Up)
1 clove of garlic, peeled and minced
1 tsp Maldon seasalt flakes
2 x 15 ml tbsp unsalted butter
1 x 15 ml tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp Aleppo pepper (or chilli flakes)
4 free-range eggs (I love Burford Browns, with their beautiful yellow yolks)
2 tbsp white vinegar
A few dill fronds, chopped (or coriander)
1 tsp sumac

Toasted sourdough slices

Feeds 2

Methods

Fill a medium-wide saucepan with water, to a depth of about 4 cm deep, add a couple of tablespoons of white wine vinegar. Cover, then place on heat.

Fill a second pan (on which a heatproof bowl can sit) with water to a depth of 3–4 cm, and bring to the boil. Put the yogurt in the heatproof bowl, stir in the garlic and salt, and sit it on top of the pan, making sure the base doesn’t touch the water. Stir the yoghurt occasionally until it reaches body temperature. Turn off the heat and leave.

Melt the butter gently in a small pan, stirring occasionally, until it is just beginning to turn nut brown (‘beurre noisette’) – take care not to burn it. Turn off the heat, then stir in the olive oil and Aleppo pepper flakes – it will foam! Leave to one side.

Now put the sourdough on to toast.

When you are ready to poach the eggs, crack the first one into a tea strainer suspended over a small bowl, then swirl gently for a few seconds, letting the watery part of the white drip into the bowl. Gently tip the egg into a small cup or ramekin. Repeat with the other eggs.

When the poaching water is simmering, gently slide in the eggs. Turn down the heat so there is no movement in the water, and poach for 3–4 minutes until the whites are set and the yolks still runny. Transfer the eggs using a slotted spoon to a kitchen paper-lined plate to remove any excess water.

Divide the warm yogurt between two shallow bowls, top with the poached eggs, pour the warm butter around and slightly over the yogurt, scatter the dill on top, add a sprinkle of sumac, and eat, dunking in the crusty bread.

 


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